Google takes the lead in securing email

Quite often Google and other internet giants have come under criticism due to the apparent failure to take sufficient action in way of protecting users. There have even been complains about Google and others helping the US government collect information on emails belonging to suspicious characters online.

One also remembers that Google was embroiled in a court case in the European Union due to collection of private data from home Wi-Fi as they did the Google street maps.

However, as a leader in the email space, Google is taking some commendable steps towards ensuring that emails stay safe. For one they will now be warning users when they receive unencrypted emails from servers other than g-mail servers.

That means that if a user gets an email from a server that does not encrypt the communication the user will have the option of rejecting that email before he or she opens it. This is especially significant considering that Google noted that there has been a remarkable rise in the number of emails sent to g-mail accounts from these unencrypted servers.

Encryption is important because it ensures that whatever is contained in the communication cannot be accessed by an interceptor. With Google taking the lead, there are two options for the servers which send unencrypted emails.

one is that they will be forced to start encryption since the alerts on g-mail will make it look like their emails are not safe and two this might turn out to be the industry standard. All email providers are likely to start encryption and that is bound to make communication safer.

There have been concerns that there is an unwillingness among the big internet companies where there are requests for surveillance by governments. However, with this move Google specifically sought to ensure that the kind of NSA snooping of data from foreign servers into Google is made hard. This is seen by many as a step to show the public that the internet giant does not agree with the wholesome affront on the right to private communication.

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